KRLA Forum
National Right to Life News | by Dave Andrusko | November 10, 2022

The defeat of Kentucky’s Amendment 2 “does not mean there is a right to abortion hidden in the Kentucky Constitution and that the regulation of abortion policy is a matter that belongs to our elected representatives”

When Kentucky’s proposed pro-life Amendment 2 narrowly lost Tuesday night, some accounts acted as though that defeat meant there was suddenly a right to abortion. The exact language was “To protect human life, nothing in this constitution shall be construed to secure or protect a right to abortion or require the funding of abortion.”

Yesterday, in a tweet Attorney General Daniel Cameron made clear that in his opinion “while this result is disappointing it does not change our belief there is no right to abortion hidden in the Kentucky Constitution and that the regulation of abortion policy is a matter that belongs to our elected representatives in the General assembly.”

On Wednesday Cameron’s office “filed a motion with the Kentucky Supreme Court to explain why this outcome has no bearing on whether the Court should consider creating a Kentucky version of Roe v. Wade. We urge the Court to interpret our Constitution based on its original meaning.”

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Current Justices of the Kentucky Supreme Court

Just before the vote, in an op-ed, state Senators Alvarado and Wise explained what the amendment would accomplish:

Voters have an opportunity to affirm unequivocally, that there is no inherent constitutional right to an abortion in the Constitution of Kentucky. …

Constitutional Amendment 2 simply does two things: it says that under the Kentucky Constitution, abortion is not a right and it prevents state funding from being used to perform them. By voting yes on this amendment, you are keeping judges from creating new constitutional rights not explicitly addressed nor even implied in our founding state document.  This amendment will continue to protect the woman’s life if a pregnancy is to be a medical risk to her life.

In an op-ed that ran October 25, Cameron wrote:

Shortly before Roe, Kentucky’s highest court considered a constitutional challenge to this statute. The court unanimously rejected the challenge and upheld the law. The court determined that deciding whether and when to prohibit abortion was a matter for the General Assembly and emphasized the court’s “obligation to exercise judicial restraint” regarding the will of the legislature.

For 49 years, our long history of protecting unborn life had been eclipsed by federal judicial activism, but thankfully the shadow of Roe has now lifted.

Read full article.


Read Attorney General Cameron’s Appeal based on case law and Kentucky’s century-long history of protecting unborn human life to the fullest extent possible.

View the briefs submitted to the Court.

Amicus brief of KRTL in support of General Cameron

Watch live coverage of the trial on KET, 10 AM Tuesday November 15.


Comments

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Peggy Pace

Mr. Cameron, thank you for fighting for the lives of our future Kentuckians. They have as much a right to live as we do. If men and women don't want babies DON'T MAKE THEM. We have many ways to prevent pregnancy from happening. Let's give away contraceptives.

Peggy Pace

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