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4D Ultrasound

yawning infant

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PHOTO CREDITS: 4D Ultrasound of fetal yawning at 30 weeks of pregnancy by Dr. Wolfgang Moroder. Baby yawning by Jeuwre. Human fetus at 10 weeks.

10 week old fetus

fetus at 10 weeks

Learn about Kentucky’s Dismemberment Law.

KRLA Forum

KRLA is committed to lobby for pro-life legislation and to keep members and the public informed about important bills. Earlier this week a special alert was sent to our e-news list to encourage pro-lifers to contact members of the House Committee on
 Elections, Constitutional Amendments & Intergovernmental Affairs regarding HB67. A link on the article leads to a list of those committee members and their contact info.

Today we encourage you to show support for HB370, AN ACT relating to the dignified treatment of fetal remains. This Bill currently is with the House Judiciary Committee, whose Republican members with their contact info is here.

You can also call the Legislative Message Line, 1-800-372-7181, to leave a message for your legislators. To find your legislator by county, go here. A list of legislators and their emails is here.

To see the list of bills that help to protect pre-born babies, go here. This week we added two bills relating to pharmacy referrals and services that touch on the issue of the Abortion Pill.

Visit the KRLA Forum Blog to stay updated on legislation currently challenged by the ACLU (et al) and developments in the 2020 Legislative Session.


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Several bills proposing to change how Kentuckians vote have been introduced. Those with heavy support of Democrat representatives and no Republican sponsorship include:
1. EARLY VOTING - HB78 / SB43 - Create a new section of KRS Chapter 117 to allow in-person early voting between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. on the three Saturdays preceding any primary, regular election, or special election…
2. SAME-DAY VOTING - HB80 / SB119 - Amend KRS 116.025 …to allow a person… to register at the person's precinct of residence on the day of a primary or an election if the person confirms his or her identity, completes the registration form and a required oath…

The dangers of early voting have been widely noted. An example:

Although voters may find early voting convenient, turnout data show that early voting may actually decrease turnout, not increase it. Early voting raises the costs of political campaigns, since expensive get-out-the-vote efforts must be spread out over a longer period of time. There is also no question that when voters cast their ballots weeks before Election Day, they do so without the same access to knowledge about the candidates and the issues as those who vote on Election Day. When there are late-breaking developments in campaigns that could be important to the choices made by voters, those who have voted early cannot change their votes.

Read more.

Other articles are here and here.

Warnings about same-day voting have also been sounded:

“Allowing a voter to both register and vote on Election Day makes it nearly impossible to prevent duplicate votes in different areas or to verify the accuracy of any information provided by a voter”…

Read more.

More on same-day voting dangers.

Let your legislator know what you think about these bills.


KRLA Forum
UPDATE on January 15, 2020

Congratulations Mike Nemes! Wins Ky State Senate seat! Read more.


Mike_Nemes.jpg The KRLA Political Action Committee has endorsed Michael Nemes for State Senate, District 38. This is Dan Seum's vacated seat.

Here is some background on Mr. Nemes from his website:

Michael Nemes knows the problems Kentuckians face every day. He understands what it’s like to be an employer and a worker; he’s been both a business owner and a union member. After 40-plus years in business, (in 2010) Mike ran for state representative to make Kentucky a better place to work and do business. He was elected State Representative for District 38… By 2015, Mike was appointed second in command of the state’s Labor Cabinet…

The Special Election will be held on January 14, 2020. Vote pro-life!


KRLA Forum

Congratulations to the Republican winners in the 2019 General Election!

The C-J reports that our new Attorney General, Daniel Cameron, won against Greg Stumbo by 220,928 votes, and Michael Adams won by 64,512 votes over Heather French Henry for Secretary of State.

Auditor Mike Harmon won by 204,766 over Sheri Donahue (D) and by 158,217 against both Donahue and the Libertarian candidate Kyle Hugenberg. Allison Ball, Treasurer, won by 300,707 over Michael Bowman, and Ryan Quarrels won by 231,515 over his opponents, Robert Conway (D) and Josh Gilpin (L).

Hmmm…

Perhaps it is the huge difference between the Governor’s and other races that seems suspect. How is it possible that Ball would win by nearly 301K votes, relative to Bevin losing by about 23K in votes cast for both Beshear and Hicks? The final tally for governor was: 709,577 for Beshear, 704,388 for Bevin, and 28,425 for Hicks (see previous article).

Is it characteristic of Republicans to split their vote and desert the Party candidate for chief state officer knowing the immense differences between the Republican and Democrat platforms? Not really. Did teachers make the difference?

Kentucky only employs 42,024 public school teachers, and certainly not all are liberal in their politics. In regard to the pension issue, many realize they make far more money in both salary and retirement funding than their friends who work in the private sector.

Private sector employees in all industries reported an average salary of $44,600 per year. During the same period, government workers reported an average annual salary of $51,840 — $7,240 per year more than private-sector employees. (Dec 31, 2018, CareerTrend)

According to the C-J final count, 1,442,390 Kentuckians voted for Governor, but 14,352 fewer voted for SOS, 17,454 fewer voted for AG, and 31,657 fewer voted for Commissioner of Agriculture and even fewer voted in the Auditor and Treasurer races.

Why do people go to the polls to vote only for a governor? It does not add up.


KRLA Forum

This expression of those with disabilities when they confront societal assaults seems to fit pro-lifers’ current position: No concession before a recount! Not dead yet!

Gov. Bevin has stated:

“We know that there are reports of people having been turned away — incorrectly turned away — from various voting booths around the state,” he said. “We know that in Jefferson County, there were a number of machines that did not work properly. So ballots were taken and just put in open boxes and people were told they'd be scanned in later.”

bevin_alvarado_sign.png

As well, Senate President Robert Stivers has said that the Kentucky Legislature could decide the race.

Stivers’ comments came shortly after Gov. Matt Bevin refused to concede to Attorney General Andy Beshear, who led by roughly 5,100 votes when all the precincts were counted.

“There’s less than one-half of 1%, as I understand, separating the governor and the attorney general,” Stivers said. “We will follow the letter of the law and what various processes determine.”

A Lexington station, WKYT, has this angle:

The Libertarian Party of Kentucky is relishing the role of spoiler in the 2019 Kentucky governor's race, as they had strong words for supporters of Gov. Matt Bevin in his apparent defeat.

Libertarian candidate John Hicks received 28,426 votes with 100 percent of precincts reporting. That total was far more than the approximately 5,000-vote difference between Democrat Andy Beshear and Republican Matt Bevin.

“We are always happy to split the vote in a way that causes delicious tears. Tonight there are plenty of delicious tears from Bevin supporters,” the party said in a Facebook post.

Last July when John Hicks was asked why voters should choose him over Matt Bevin and Andy Beshear, he said he’s “the one candidate that hasn’t been yelling at another candidate for the past four years.”

Hicks said he was running on the themes of liberty, civility and election reform. “Depending on the voter I think civility might be something where I really shine,” he said.

On their website, Libertarians state they are opposed to Government-regulated morality. What does that POSSIBLY mean? ? ? Should there be no laws against robbery, murder, extortion, etc? Are crimes OK so long as the deeds are done with diplomacy and kind words?

Who is John Hicks? As reported in the C-J last spring…

After a federal judge temporarily blocked a new section of a state law related to filing deadlines, a Libertarian Party candidate has officially joined the 2019 race to become Kentucky’s next governor….

“A lot of Gov. Bevin's policies have been right on,” Hicks said. “But his rhetoric has been terrible.”

By rhetoric, we believe Hicks was referring in part to Bevin’s statement, “I am unapologetically pro-life.” But rhetoric is the art of effective or persuasive speaking or writing, especially the use of figures of speech and other compositional techniques. Bevin is, in contrast, straight-forward.

Some opinions published in the C-J have expressed that Gov. Bevin’s personality worked against him. Yet, he is certainly less confrontational than President Trump, and Trump fills every stadium to overflowing for each of his rallies. Could it be that media disinformation about pensions affected the (assumed) outcome? Or, was it the continual biased, negative comments and media attacks?

The C-J and John Hicks have suggested that Bevin lost due to replacing Jenean Hampton with Ralph Alvarado. We don’t buy this. No true pro-lifer would let personal feelings affect their voting decisions.



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Kentucky Right to Life

Kentucky's largest and oldest right to life organization and the official state affiliate of the National Right to Life Committee

134 Breckinridge Lane
Louisville, KY 40207

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